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Building Physics - Heat, Air and Moisture :Fundamentals and Engineering Methods with Examples and Exercises. / Hugo Hens

By: Hens, Hugo.
Contributor(s): Hens, Hugo.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Berlin : Wiley, 2012Edition: 3rd Ed.Description: 331p. 24cm.ISBN: 9783433031971.Subject(s): Engineering | Construction of buildings | Heating, ventilating, air-conditioning engineering | Power resources | Heating | PhysicsDDC classification: 697 HEN
Contents:
Title; Preface; Table of Contents; 0 Introduction; 0.1 Subject of the book; 0.2 Building Physics; 0.2.1 Definition; 0.2.2 Criteria; 0.2.2.1 Comfort; 0.2.2.2 Health; 0.2.2.3 Architecture and materials; 0.2.2.4 Economy; 0.2.2.5 Sustainability; 0.3 Importance of Building Physics; 0.4 History of Building Physics; 0.4.1 Heat, air and moisture; 0.4.2 Building acoustics; 0.4.3 Lighting; 0.4.4 Thermal comfort and indoor air quality; 0.4.5 Building physics and building services; 0.4.6 Building physics and construction; 0.4.7 What about the Low Countries?; 0.5 Units and symbols; 0.6 Literature. 1 Heat Transfer1.1 Overview; 1.2 Conduction; 1.2.1 Conservation of energy; 1.2.2 Fourier's laws; 1.2.2.1 First law; 1.2.2.2 Second law; 1.2.3 Steady state; 1.2.3.1 What is it?; 1.2.3.2 One dimension: flat assemblies; 1.2.3.3 Two dimensions: cylinder symmetric; 1.2.3.4 Two and three dimensions: thermal bridges; 1.2.4 Transient regime; 1.2.4.1 What?; 1.2.4.2 Flat assemblies, periodic boundary conditions; 1.2.4.3 Flat assemblies, random boundary conditions; 1.2.4.4 Two and three dimensions; 1.3 Convection; 1.3.1 Heat exchange at a surface; 1.3.2 Convective heat transfer. 1.3.3 Convection typology1.3.3.1 Driving forces; 1.3.3.2 Flow type; 1.3.4 Calculating the convective surface film coefficient; 1.3.4.1 Analytically; 1.3.4.2 Numerically; 1.3.4.3 Dimensional analysis; 1.3.5 Values for the convective surface film coefficient; 1.3.5.1 Flat assemblies; 1.3.5.2 Cavities; 1.3.5.3 Pipes; 1.4 Radiation; 1.4.1 What is thermal radiation?; 1.4.2 Quantities; 1.4.3 Reflection, absorption and transmission; 1.4.4 Radiant surfaces or bodies; 1.4.5 Black bodies; 1.4.5.1 Characteristics; 1.4.5.2 Radiant exchange between two black bodies: the view factor. 1.4.5.3 Properties of view factors1.4.5.4 Calculating view factors; 1.4.6 Grey bodies; 1.4.6.1 Characteristics; 1.4.6.2 Radiant exchange between grey bodies; 1.4.7 Coloured bodies; 1.4.8 Practical formulae; 1.5 Applications; 1.5.1 Surface film coefficients and reference temperatures; 1.5.1.1 Overview; 1.5.1.2 Indoor environment; 1.5.1.3 Outdoor environment; 1.5.2 Steady state, one dimension: flat assemblies; 1.5.2.1 Thermal transmittance and interface temperatures; 1.5.2.2 Thermal resistance of a non ventilated, infinite cavity; 1.5.2.3 Solar transmittance. 1.5.3 Steady state, cylindrical coordinates: pipes1.5.4 Steady state, two and three dimensions: thermal bridges; 1.5.4.1 Calculation by the control volume method (CVM); 1.5.4.2 Practice; 1.5.5 Steady state: windows; 1.5.6 Steady state: building envelopes; 1.5.6.1 Overview; 1.5.6.2 Average thermal transmittance; 1.5.7 Transient, periodic: flat assemblies.; 1.5.8 Heat balances; 1.5.9 Transient, periodic: spaces; 1.5.9.1 Assumptions; 1.5.9.2 Steady state heat balance; 1.5.9.3 Harmonic heat balances 103; 1.6 Problems; 1.7 Literature; 2 Mass Transfer; 2.1 Generalities.
Summary: Bad experiences with construction quality, the energy crises of 1973 and 1979, complaints about 'sick buildings', thermal, acoustical, visual and olfactory discomfort, the need for good air quality, the move towards more sustainability, all have accelerated the development of a field, which until some 40 years ago was hardly more than an academic exercise: building physics. Building physics combines several knowledge domains such as heat and mass transfer, building acoustics, lighting, indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency. In some countries, also fire safety is included. Through t.
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Title; Preface; Table of Contents; 0 Introduction; 0.1 Subject of the book; 0.2 Building Physics; 0.2.1 Definition; 0.2.2 Criteria; 0.2.2.1 Comfort; 0.2.2.2 Health; 0.2.2.3 Architecture and materials; 0.2.2.4 Economy; 0.2.2.5 Sustainability; 0.3 Importance of Building Physics; 0.4 History of Building Physics; 0.4.1 Heat, air and moisture; 0.4.2 Building acoustics; 0.4.3 Lighting; 0.4.4 Thermal comfort and indoor air quality; 0.4.5 Building physics and building services; 0.4.6 Building physics and construction; 0.4.7 What about the Low Countries?; 0.5 Units and symbols; 0.6 Literature. 1 Heat Transfer1.1 Overview; 1.2 Conduction; 1.2.1 Conservation of energy; 1.2.2 Fourier's laws; 1.2.2.1 First law; 1.2.2.2 Second law; 1.2.3 Steady state; 1.2.3.1 What is it?; 1.2.3.2 One dimension: flat assemblies; 1.2.3.3 Two dimensions: cylinder symmetric; 1.2.3.4 Two and three dimensions: thermal bridges; 1.2.4 Transient regime; 1.2.4.1 What?; 1.2.4.2 Flat assemblies, periodic boundary conditions; 1.2.4.3 Flat assemblies, random boundary conditions; 1.2.4.4 Two and three dimensions; 1.3 Convection; 1.3.1 Heat exchange at a surface; 1.3.2 Convective heat transfer. 1.3.3 Convection typology1.3.3.1 Driving forces; 1.3.3.2 Flow type; 1.3.4 Calculating the convective surface film coefficient; 1.3.4.1 Analytically; 1.3.4.2 Numerically; 1.3.4.3 Dimensional analysis; 1.3.5 Values for the convective surface film coefficient; 1.3.5.1 Flat assemblies; 1.3.5.2 Cavities; 1.3.5.3 Pipes; 1.4 Radiation; 1.4.1 What is thermal radiation?; 1.4.2 Quantities; 1.4.3 Reflection, absorption and transmission; 1.4.4 Radiant surfaces or bodies; 1.4.5 Black bodies; 1.4.5.1 Characteristics; 1.4.5.2 Radiant exchange between two black bodies: the view factor. 1.4.5.3 Properties of view factors1.4.5.4 Calculating view factors; 1.4.6 Grey bodies; 1.4.6.1 Characteristics; 1.4.6.2 Radiant exchange between grey bodies; 1.4.7 Coloured bodies; 1.4.8 Practical formulae; 1.5 Applications; 1.5.1 Surface film coefficients and reference temperatures; 1.5.1.1 Overview; 1.5.1.2 Indoor environment; 1.5.1.3 Outdoor environment; 1.5.2 Steady state, one dimension: flat assemblies; 1.5.2.1 Thermal transmittance and interface temperatures; 1.5.2.2 Thermal resistance of a non ventilated, infinite cavity; 1.5.2.3 Solar transmittance. 1.5.3 Steady state, cylindrical coordinates: pipes1.5.4 Steady state, two and three dimensions: thermal bridges; 1.5.4.1 Calculation by the control volume method (CVM); 1.5.4.2 Practice; 1.5.5 Steady state: windows; 1.5.6 Steady state: building envelopes; 1.5.6.1 Overview; 1.5.6.2 Average thermal transmittance; 1.5.7 Transient, periodic: flat assemblies.; 1.5.8 Heat balances; 1.5.9 Transient, periodic: spaces; 1.5.9.1 Assumptions; 1.5.9.2 Steady state heat balance; 1.5.9.3 Harmonic heat balances 103; 1.6 Problems; 1.7 Literature; 2 Mass Transfer; 2.1 Generalities.

Bad experiences with construction quality, the energy crises of 1973 and 1979, complaints about 'sick buildings', thermal, acoustical, visual and olfactory discomfort, the need for good air quality, the move towards more sustainability, all have accelerated the development of a field, which until some 40 years ago was hardly more than an academic exercise: building physics. Building physics combines several knowledge domains such as heat and mass transfer, building acoustics, lighting, indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency. In some countries, also fire safety is included. Through t.

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